Boston Manor - GLUE
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Boston Manor’s 2016 debut album Be Nothing cemented the Blackpool natives into the British pop punk scene, but it’s their sophomore album Welcome to the Neighborhood that blew the lads into the wider alternative scene, with sounds from them we’d never heard.

This was a real turning point for them, which was shown on their headline tour to support the album with packed out rooms of theatres, and even a show on a boat! Here we saw the far more experimental side of the band, bringing in influences from all waves of music including hip-hop, electronic, post hardcore, and some elements of R&B. Often times raw, energetic, and brutally emotional in regards to lyrics facing societal issues, Welcome to the Neighbourhood made my top 3 albums of 2018.

Please welcome the third instalment of Boston Manor’s worldwide takeover – GLUE.

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Opening track ‘Everything is Ordinary’ was the leading single for the album, which is a loud projection of electronic pace with pure punk energy and was a great choice by the band to market as their lead. This track sounds like nothing Boston Manor have ever released, and I’m all for it.

Next track ‘1’s & 0’s’ sounds like something we may hear on their previous album, with a touch more of a post hardcore influence and a very interesting distorted breakdown towards the end – which I love – before ending with the chorus.

‘Plasticine Dreams’ is the first time we hear frontman Henry Cox’s softer side, vocally. This is a staple track for this album, and shows us the more pop rock sound that Boston Manor hasn’t shown too often.

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‘Terrible Love’ is the fourth track on the album, which starts off quite mellow, with a distorted soft guitar riff which isolates Cox’s voice. The chorus is one of the most impressive in Boston Manor’s catalogue – super catchy and perfectly produced.

Then comes ‘On a High Ledge’, which is one of the most emotional tracks on the record, after being inspired by an unforgettable moment in Henry Cox’s life. When he was just 7 years old, Henry witnessed a man commit suicide in his hometown of Blackpool, and ‘On a High Ledge’ is a homage to the rising number of suicides amongst men.

‘You, Me & The Class War’ is a total banger. In the first few seconds of the song, you’ll question if you are listening to a Knocked Loose album rather than Boston Manor. The instant screams sound similar to that of Bryan Garris (of Oldham County’s hardcore powerhouses Knocked Loose), and I think this would blow the roof off of any venue when played live.

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‘Playing God’ is a track filled with real pessimism but carries a subtle ambience until the chorus comes in to knock your socks off.

‘Stuck In The Mud’ is somewhat of a ballad – sharing instrumental similarities with ‘The Day That I Ruined Your Life’ from their previous album. The lyrics make an emotional story of being lost and having an inability to find his way; this track shows Cox at his most vulnerable.

‘Liquid’ is a track we’ve heard before, with a guest spot from none other than Trophy Eyes frontman John Floreani.

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The album closes with ‘Monolith’, a five and a half minute angry release of tension with the chant, “Hey, you – fuck you too, I’ll do what I want when I want to.” The track is a big middle finger from the band to everybody out there making the world a worse place. The track then ends with a piano piece to fade the album to a strong finish.

GLUE is out tomorrow, Friday 1st May. Pre-order and pre-save it here.