VultureHound’s Weekly News Round-Up (24/02/2019)

Hello and welcome to VultureHound‘s weekly news round-up, where we bring you the biggest and best news to come out of the film industry every Sunday.

Except we’re doing this one on a Monday, because the Oscars were last night and it feels silly to continuously put this out the day before every awards ceremony airs.

We’ll return to our regular schedule next week.

This week:
– Taron Egerton dazzles in new Rocketman trailer!
– What going on with Bond 25?
– The Oscar results revealed!

Read on to find out more!

New Rocketman trailer exclaims why people pay to see Elton John

First up, this past week saw a new trailer for Rocketman, the Elton John biopic starring Taron Egerton. The film will be directed by Dexter Fletcher, the man responsible for the reshoots on the recent (Oscar-winning) Queen biopic Bohemian Rhapsody.

This new trailer gives a better overview of the story and Elton’s relationship with the various characters:

Rocketman flies into cinemas on May 31st 2019.

 

What’s going on with Bond?

Daniel Craig / Skyfall / Picture courtesy of Eon

Now that Ben Affleck has finally, officially, relinquished the role of the Batman, our new longest running problematic production is probably that of the next James Bond film.

This past week, there have been two major reveals about the production. The first is that the film has moved release date, being pushed back from it’s Valentine’s Day release to occupy a space previously taken by Fast and Furious 9 in April (Fast and Furious, in turn, has been pushed back to May).

The film is also undergoing re-writes, as Scott Z. Burns (writer: The Bourne Ultimatum) has been hired to doctor the script over the next month in London.

Following the news of a release date change and the script edits, the working title for the film was also revealed. Currently known as Shatterhand, the new Bond film promises to continue the trend of increasingly tying the story back into the prior events of Craig/Bond’s life. The reason this has some excited is because ‘Shatterhand’ is one of the many aliases of Bond’s archenemy, Blofeld.

While this all could be a red-herring, it makes sense that for his final outing as 007, Craig would return to finish what his rival started, and take on the conventionally scarred criminal.

Bond 25 now shoots into cinemas on April 10th 2019.

 

The 2019 Oscar Results

And now, for the real meat of this week’s news, and the reason we’re doing things on a Monday, the Oscar results are in!

Airing late last night for us British viewers, the Oscars have faced a difficult road to airing, as they’ve had presenter troubles, backlash against their new ideas, and constant back-and-forth about how they should actually proceed with the ceremony.

But whatever they went with, it’s over now, and the results are as follows:

BEST PICTURE went to Green Book, a comedy-drama surrounding the unlikely friendship between Tony Lip, an Italian-American bouncer/driver, and his temporary employer, Dr. Don Shirley, a black musician who is travelling through the deep south. The film stars Mahershala Ali as Shirley and Viggo Mortensen as Lip. The film was directed by Peter Farrelly and beat out contenders such as ViceBohemian Rhapsody and Black PantherGreen Book‘s writers, Farrelly, Nick Vallelonga and Brian Currie also scored the Oscar for BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY.

Surprising no one, BEST ORIGINAL SONG was won by ‘Shallow’, the hit from A Star Is Born. The song is performed by Lady Gaga and director Bradley Cooper (and was performed by them at the ceremony):

BEST SOUND MIXING went to John Casali, Tim Cavagin and Paul Massey, the men behind the sounds of the other extremely popular musical of the past year, Bohemian Rhapsody. John Ottman also won the film BEST EDITING, while Nina Hartstone and John Warhurst claimed BEST SOUND EDITING.

However, neither musical managed to win BEST ORIGINAL MUSIC SCORE. That honour instead went to the cultural phenomenon from the superhero genre, Black Panther and its composer Ludwig Göransson. The film’s costume designer, Ruth E. Carter, also snagged BEST COSTUME DESIGN, while Jay R. Hart and Hannah Beachler won BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN.

But even without the original score award, Bohemian Rhapsody was far from done, as its star Rami Malek managed to secure the coveted BEST ACTOR award for his star-making performance as Queen frontman Freddie Mercury.

BEST ACTRESS meanwhile went to the ever-popular Olivia Colman, for her portrayal of Queen Anne in Yorgos Lanthimos’ newest comedy-drama The Favourite.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR went to Mahershala Ali for his role in Green Book, his second ‘Supporting Actor’ award after appearing in Moonlight two years ago.

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS was won by Regina King for her role as Sharon Rivers, the mother of the main character in If Beale Street Could Talk. 

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE found itself webbed up by Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, the animated movie that some claim is the best Spider-Man film ever.

BEST DIRECTOR went to Alfonso Cuarón for Roma, a Spanish language drama that is currently available to watch on Netflix. As you might expect, the movie also won BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM. Cuarón’s efforts also won BEST CINEMATOGROPHY.

BEST DOCUMENTARY was won by Free Solo, the rock-climbing documentary in which Alex Honnold attempts to conquer El Capitan 900 meter climb in Yosemite National Park. The title refers to the type of rock climbing in which you climb without any equipment.

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY was given to Spike Lee, Kevin Willmott, Charlie Wachtel and David Rabinowitz for their efforts on BlacKkKlansman, the incredibly entertaining (and intense) true story about the first black police officer in Colorado Springs.

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS went to First Man, beating out the likes of Ready Player OneInfinity War and Solo.

BEST ANIMATED SHORT film was won by Bao, the adorable and emotional animation that debuted ahead of The Incredibles 2.

Not to be forgotten, Vice, one of the BAFTA favourites, also managed to get BEST MAKEUP, courtesy of Greg Cannom, Kate Biscoe and Patricia Dehaney-Le May.

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