Kelvin Jones – The Barfly, London (Live Review)

Walking into the Barfly I did not know what to expect. Kelvin Jones is an artist in his infancy. Kelvin walked onto the stage confidently filling me with a certainty that he would give a self-assured performance. This certainty was proved correct.

Jones took to the stage between two impressive performers, Hannah Trigwell and Corey Fox Fardell, but he showed that he belonged on that stage just as much as they did. Kelvin’s performance was pared down and stripped back. At one point he abandoned his microphone and it was just him, his guitar and the audience. There were no gimmicks and no special effects. This caused it to feel intimate like each listener was having a one on one concert with him. This was only aided by the small, intimate venue. There was just a small stage between Kelvin and the audience.

His self-depreciating humour made it clear that he was not just a capable singer but a nice guy too. His humour put me at ease, here was a man who could command a stage.

His set was a mixture of covers and his own material. He drew the audience in with songs they would know and teased them with his own material. His performance of Aloe Blacc’s ‘I Need a Dollar’ had the audience in the palm of his hand. People were clapping, swaying and singing along- he really put on a show. However it was his own material that really drew me in. His words were touching and beautiful, track ‘Closer’ had a lovely folksy feel to it. As I found was typical of Kelvin, this song was infectious. I could not resist singing along to it. Aside from being an adept singer and guitarist he is also an assured songwriter. His voice is like honey. It is sweet and smooth. It was a pleasure to listen to him. He could hit notes that amazed me.

He closed his set with his song ‘Call You Home’. This is perhaps his most popular and recognisable song, it has an impressive 542, 712 views on YouTube. He used his trademark acoustic guitar to great effect in this song. It was catchy. I found myself singing it on the train journey home. He ended his performance with a bang.

The concert drew to an end with Hannah Trigwell, Corey Fox Fardell and Kelvin Jones performing a cover of Stevie Wonder’s song Superstition. Jones stood out with his soulful voice and confident performance. Kelvin was a support act to Hannah Trigwell, but I predict that in the future he will headline his own tour.

I had never heard of Kelvin Jones or his music before I arrived at Barfly, but after being immersed in his songs and performance I can say I am a fan of his, this is the highest accolade I can give.