LA born and Surrey raised, Andrew Garfield began his acting career in British television and theatre. His first role in a feature length film was in Robert Redford’s Lions for Lambs. This was followed by a mix of low budget, independent shorts and huge Box Office hits. He has won a number of awards, including a BAFTA Rising Star Award and an Actor of the Year award from the London Film Critics’ Circle. In recent years Garfield has portrayed a diverse range of characters, resulting in a rather eclectic filmography. Garfield’s latest film, 99 Homes (which is also his producing debut) is out on Digital HD, Blu-ray and DVD now and to celebrate, we’re taking a look at his career in television and film.

 

Mumbo Jumbo (2005)

Garfield’s first taste of film was in the 2005 short, Mumbo Jumbo. Directed by Bevan Walsh, it had a budget of just £4000. Playing the character of Simmo, Garfield swanned around in a tracksuit and showed off an impressive cockney accent.

 

Sugar Rush (2005)

Garfield played the supporting role of Tom in the British TV series, Sugar Rush. Tom was a shy and endearing character, with a painfully awkward crush on his lesbian neighbour, Kimberly (Olivia Hallinan).

 

Lions for Lambs (2007)

For his debut role in feature film, Garfield played Todd Hayes, a gifted but disaffected student in Robert Redford’s Lions for Lambs. Although the film wasn’t a critical success, it launched Garfield’s career in film and he was able to work alongside Tom Cruise and Meryl Streep.

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Boy A (2007)

Boy A saw Garfield portray Eric Wilson, an ex-convict seeking redemption and a fresh start. The film was critically acclaimed and won a number of awards, including a Best Actor BAFTA TV Award for Garfield.

 

Red Riding (2009)

Returning back to the smaller screen, Garfield played cocky news reporter, Eddie Dunford in the three-part television adaptation of David Peace’s Red Riding Quartet. The series was both a critical and commercial success.

 

The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (2009)

Garfield played Anton, a member of Doctor Parnassus’ theatre troupe in the fantasy film directed by Terry Gilliam. He worked along side an impressive cast, including Heath Ledger and Johnny Depp.

 

I’m Here (2010)

Starring in Spike Jonze’s sci-fi romance short, Garfield played a robot called Sheldon, living in a world where humans and robots co-exist. His monotonous life is disrupted when he falls for another robot, Francesca (Sienna Guillory). Despite the robot costumes, both Garfield and Guillory give emotional and heart warming performances.

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Never Let Me Go (2010)

Garfield starred as Tommy D in the romantic drama based on the novel by Kazuo Ishiguro. Based in an alternative history, the film follows themes such as immortality and humanism, as well as a love triangle between Tommy, Kathy (Carrie Mulligan) and Ruth (Keira Knightly). Garfield won a number of awards for his performance, including Best Supporting Actor from the British Independent Film Awards.

 

The Social Network (2010)

The biographical drama told the story of Mark Zuckerberg, the creator of Facebook. Garfield plays Eduardo Saverin, Zuckerberg’s friend and the first Facebook investor. This was Garfield’s biggest film to date, and he received great recognition for his supporting role, including two awards from the London Evening Standard and the London Film Critics’ Circle.

 

The Amazing Spider-Man (2012)

Garfield then partnered with Marvel to star in the new Spider-Man franchise. The role was a far cry from any previous parts, and it launched Garfield into mainstream media. Both films were a commercial success and Garfield proved to be a popular casting choice.

Garfield’s latest work, 99 Homes, is out on Digital HD 18th January and Blu-ray and DVD 25th January. The American drama shows Dennis Nash (Garfield), as a single Father struggling to buy back the house he and his family were evicted from. Desperation leads him to work for sly real estate broker, Rick Carver (Michael Shannon), the very man that caused his anguish.

 

By Michael Dickinson

Michael is the VultureHound Film Editor.