What We’re Watching

You’ve heard the term ‘mindfulness’. Nothing harmful in itself, on the contrary, but one that looks down its zen little nose at its slovenly counterpart: mindlessness.

It ain’t right.

We should embrace mindlessness in its own right. Everybody with a busy schedule needs a little mental TLC. And what better way to shut off, while still learning something new, than to watch some shows?

Recently I’ve been watching…

What’s with Andy?

This Canadian cartoon seems to be quite niche, as the only people who know about it are, for obvious reasons, Canadians, and, strangely enough, Romanian kids who benefitted from a wildly beloved dubbed version in the early 2000’s. Man, those were the days.

I watch this with my flatmate when we eat pizza. It’s a cartoon that has those jokes that you don’t get as a kid that make you hyperventilate as an adult, without being particularly wild. Check out full episodes on Youtube.

What's With Andy?

War and Peace

This is the kind of show that would seem 100% boring (presumably to people who are not in the literary sphere) but which actually captivates you. I’m so fascinated by those plot intricacies that I even surprised myself. Thanks, Tolstoy, and thanks, Netflix, for staying true to him.

War and Peace

The Pyramid Code

This 5-episode documentary takes me back to primary school, when everyone was obsessed with learning about Egypt and we took a day trip to the museum to see King Tut. If you’re a bit mystic, this will strike you as extremely cool, although there is no right answer. On the flip side, it gives you the context to Google debunking theories and draw your own conclusions. Take it with a grain of salt and watch for simple entertainment, though it’s still pretty cool how much information we have access to nowadays – things you would, in all likelihood, have no idea about otherwise.

The Pyramid Code

Last Tango in Halifax

A show that is both interesting and that gives you the impression that people are doing something positive in the world. Older people are under-represented in society, rarely in the spotlight and when they are, the subject of the stereotypical banter. It’s refreshing to see them portrayed in a very humane and understanding way. The feeling is cozy and the portrayal of emotion is genuine.

Last Tango in Halifax